Contact Information:

Renata Limited

Plot - 1, Milk Vita Road,

Section - 7, Mirpur,

Dhaka-1216, Bangladesh

Telephone: +(880-2) 8001450-237

PARTNERS

GAIN

GAIN

The Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (“GAIN”), headquartered in Geneva, is an alliance driven by the vision of a world without malnutrition. GAIN’s mission is to reduce malnutrition through food fortification and other sustainable strategies aimed at improving the health and nutrition of populations at risk.

 

GAIN mobilizes public-private partnerships and provides financial and technical support to deliver healthier foods and supplements to vulnerable populations. Innovative partnership projects in 26 countries reach over 200 million people with fortified foods. More than half of these individuals are women and children. GAIN’s Nutrition Program aims to reach one billion people.

 

GAIN was created in 2002 at a Special Session of the UN General Assembly on Children and became a Swiss foundation in 2003. GAIN receives funding from a number of organizations including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).


http://www.gainhealth.org/


Sprinkles Global Health Initiative

Sprinkles Global Health Initiative

Sprinkles Global Health Initiative (“SGHI”) is primarily a research organization. SGHI’s vision is the elimination of childhood malnutrition, and its mission is to help eliminate malnutrition, including micronutrient malnutrition, through focused research and advocacy.

 

As the inventor of Sprinkles (the original, five micro-nutrient version of Pushtikona) and the concept of ‘home-fortification’, and having performed research in many countries around the world, SGHI staff have a great deal of experience and technical expertise. SGHI’s activities focus on clinical and implementation research to investigate the general causes of malnutrition in infants and young children, in order to develop new and suitable nutritional interventions. As well, SGHI’s research activities continue to improve Sprinkles and facilitate its widespread global use. SGHI aims to generate new findings and transfer knowledge gained from its experiences with Sprinkles to improve access to all nutritional interventions. SGHI believes in an evidence-based approach to solving global malnutrition and has the organizational capacity to generate the evidence needed to support new programs and products.

 

SGHI also advocates with local, national and international organizations (including the United Nations) and the private sector for the expanded use of proven interventions to control malnutrition. Furthermore, SGHI facilitates the development of partnerships between and among organizations in both the public and private sectors to encourage a more coordinated and effective implementation of Sprinkles programs.


http://www.sghi.org/


BRAC

BRAC

Through its years of struggle against chronic deprivation, hunger and injustice, Bangladesh has been home to many innovations in tackling poverty. BRAC, a development organisation founded by Fazle Hasan Abed in February 1972, soon after the liberation of Bangladesh, has acted as both the initiator and catalyst for many such innovations and change. BRAC’s mission is to empower people and communities in situations of poverty, illiteracy, disease and social injustice. BRAC’s interventions aim to achieve large scale, positive changes through economic and social programmes that enable men and women to realise their potential

 

BRAC’s initial focus was on assisting the refugees returning from India to their newly independent country. In 1973, the organisation broadened focus to long term sustainable poverty reduction. Over the course of its evolution, BRAC has established itself as a pioneer in recognising and tackling the different dimensions of poverty. BRAC’s unique, holistic approach to poverty alleviation and empowerment of the poor encompasses a range of core programmes in economic and social development, health, education, and human rights and legal services.

 

Today, BRAC is the largest non-governmental organization in the Southern hemisphere and employs more than 100,000 people, the majority of which are women, and reaches more than 110 million people with development interventions in Asia and Africa.


http://www.brac.net/


Renata Ltd.

Renata Ltd.

Renata Limited (“Renata”), a publicly listed company on the Dhaka Stock Exchange, manufactures and markets Human Pharmaceuticals and Animal Therapeutics. Renata’s mission is to provide maximum value to its customers, shareholders, colleagues, and communities where they live and work. Renata is 51%-owned by SAJIDA Foundation, a non-governmental organization focused on microfinance and health.

 

Renata started its operations as Pfizer (Bangladesh) Limited in 1972. For the next two decades it continued as a highly successful subsidiary of Pfizer Corporation. However, by the late 1990s the focus of Pfizer had shifted from formulations to research. In accordance with this transformation, Pfizer divested its interests in many countries, including Bangladesh. Specifically, in 1993 Pfizer transferred the ownership of its Bangladesh operations to local shareholders (including SAJIDA Foundation), and the name of the company was changed to Renata Limited.


http://www.renata-ltd.com/


The Importance of Breastfeeding and Appropriate Complementary Feeding Practices

Exclusive breastfeeding until the completion of the first six months and continued breastfeeding for two years or beyond is essential for optimal child health.

After the completion of six months, along with continued, frequent, on-demand breastfeeding until 2 years of age or beyond, appropriate complementary foods should be introduced.

Infants are particularly vulnerable during the transition period when complementary feeding begins. Ensuring that their nutritional needs are met thus requires that complementary foods be:

  • timely – meaning that they are introduced when the need for energy and nutrients exceeds what can be provided through exclusive and frequent breastfeeding;
  • adequate – meaning that they provide sufficient energy, protein, fat and micronutrients to meet a growing child’s nutritional needs;
  • safe – meaning that they are hygienically stored and prepared, and fed with clean hands using clean utensils and not bottles and teats;
  • properly fed – meaning that they are given consistent with a child’s signals of appetite and satiety, and that meal frequency and feeding method – Actively encourage the child, even during illness, to consume sufficient food using fingers, spoon or self-feeding.Feed infants directly and assist older children when they feed themselves.

Watch: The Importance of Breastfeeding – Public Service Announcement

Watch: The Importance of Breastfeeding – Public Service Announcement